Adelaide and Kangaroo Island

October 09, 2017  •  Leave a Comment

In Adelaide, I attended the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) Australia and New Zealand Conference that was held at the Adelaide Health and Medical Sciences building, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, and was hosted by the Adelaide Dental School.

IMG_0074IMG_0074

While in South Australia, Gisela and I could not miss a visit to the Penfolds Winery at Magill Estate Cellar Door, the birthplace for some of the most famous Australian winemaking stories, dating back to 1844.

HEI_9048HEI_9048 HEI_9057HEI_9057 HEI_9061HEI_9061 HEI_9066HEI_9066

The Magill Estate Cellar Door offers fine dining and serene views of Penfolds first vineyard. It’s located just 8 kilometres from Adelaide CBD in the sheltered haunches of the Mounty Lofty Ranges, making it one of the world’s few urban single vineyards.

HEI_9047HEI_9047 After the success of early sherries and fortified wines, founders Dr Christopher and Mary Penfold planted their vine cuttings they had carried on their voyage over to Australia. In 1844 the fledgeling vineyard was officially established as the Penfolds wine company at Magill Estate. In 1948, history was made again as Max Schubert became the company’s first Chief Winemaker.

HEI_9134HEI_9134

A loyal company man and true innovator, Schubert would propel Penfolds onto the global stage with his experimentation of long-lasting wines - the creation of Penfolds Grange in the 1950s. In 1959 (while Schubert was perfecting his Grange experiment in secret), the tradition of ‘bin wines’ began. Here all the vintages of the Grange in a long row.

Grange

The first, a Shiraz wine with the grapes of the company’s own Barossa Valley vineyards was simply named after the storage area of the cellars where it is aged. And so Kalimna Bin 28 became the first official Penfolds Bin number wine. In 1988 Schubert was named Decanter Magazine’s Man of the Year, and on the 50th anniversary of its birth, Penfolds Grange was given a heritage listing in South Australia. After the tour and the wine tasting, we enjoyed a tasting menu of (1) mussels + lemongrass + chilli, (2) beef tartare + fries + béarnaise, (3) roasted cauliflower + lemon + nuts, (4) snapper + parsnip + beetroot crisp + cassalinga, and as last course (5) chocolate parfait + honeycomb + ginger + rhubarb. And of course, all with wine pairing. 

HEI_9055HEI_9055 HEI_9064HEI_9064 HEI_9054HEI_9054 HEI_9119HEI_9119

On Wednesday, we started our 3-day vacation on Kangaroo Island, the third largest island off the coast of Australia with a population of 4,600 on an area of 4,416 square kilometres (155 kilometres long and up to 55 kilometres wide). We rented a cabin at Hanson Bay. Due to its isolation, the impact of  European settlement is minimal on the island’s flora and fauna. When accessing the island via the SeaLink car ferry, many warning signs make visitors aware of the dangers of contaminating this pristine island with pests only found on the mainland.

IMG_0110IMG_0110 HEI_9169HEI_9169 It also features the oldest bee sanctuary in the world being home to the only pure strain of Ligurian Bee stock. Fifty stationary bee hives at Hanson Bay produce honey on a 20,000 acres foraging area which is 90% old growth native woodlands and 10% native grassland. 

HEI_9917HEI_9917 HEI_9903HEI_9903 IMG_0275IMG_0275

HEI_9573HEI_9573 HEI_9435HEI_9435   HEI_9398HEI_9398

Arriving at our cabin at Hanson Bay, we enjoyed the spectacular ocean view of the rugged coast and Southern Ocean and learned that we were surrounded by the 2,000 hectares (5,000 acres) Hanson Bay Wildlife Sanctuary.  

HEI_9629-EditHEI_9629-Edit HEI_9650HEI_9650 HEI_9672HEI_9672

Porch at Hanson Bay Cabin.

On Thursday, we visited the Koala Walk among Eucalyptus trees. Koalas are an introduced species on Kangaroo Island with their population exploding in the past years.

HEI_9187HEI_9187 HEI_9204HEI_9204 HEI_9218HEI_9218 HEI_9252HEI_9252 HEI_9304HEI_9304 HEI_9313HEI_9313 HEI_9331HEI_9331 HEI_9347HEI_9347

HEI_9377HEI_9377 HEI_9385HEI_9385

During our visit, while walking between the Eucalyptus trees and in an open grassland area observing the Wallabies, we were attacked by Australian Magpies. We were able to find many of the Cape Barren Geese, the rarest geese in the world. 

HEI_9419HEI_9419 HEI_9495HEI_9495 HEI_9527HEI_9527 HEI_9517HEI_9517

On Friday, we visited the Remarkable Rocks, a formation of rocks that was exposed to erosion (heating, wetting, cooling and drying)  for the last 200 million years creating a granite dome.

HEI_9683HEI_9683 HEI_9694-EditHEI_9694-Edit HEI_9706HEI_9706 HEI_9739-EditHEI_9739-Edit

Near the Remarkable Rocks, we saw a colony of Australian sea lions and Long-nosed fur seals at Admirals Arch. We explored the board walk at Seal Bay.

HEI_9823HEI_9823 HEI_9866HEI_9866 HEI_9854HEI_9854 HEI_9815HEI_9815

We also saw Echidnas, but only as road kill, but these egg laying mammals can sometimes be seen when they forage for ants. While our first visit to the platypus water holes was unsuccessful, we drove to the same location later at night again and saw for first time in the wild these very elusive animals coming. They came out when it was almost dark, so my pictures leave much to be desired.  

IMG_0263IMG_0263   HEI_9942HEI_9942

On Saturday morning, we drove at dawn back to the SeaLink ferry. During the 150 kilometre drive we stopped counting the kangaroos and wallabies on street when we hit about 50 and estimate that we saw far more than 100 hopping animals on the road... which made as slow down so much that we almost missed the ferry.

HEI_9923HEI_9923 IMG_0195IMG_0195 IMG_0200IMG_0200 HEI_9925HEI_9925

Here are more pictures.


Comments

No comments posted.
Loading...

This is a photographic diary of our adventures in Australia with emphasis on Sydney and its surroundings.
Subscribe
RSS
Archive
January February March April May June July August September October November (2) December (1)
January (2) February March (1) April (2) May (1) June (4) July (1) August (4) September October (2) November December